The Museum Home of Giovanni Spadolini at Pian dei Giullari – by Cosimo Ceccuti

1
Giovanni Spadolini (1925-1994) in his library
Cosimo Ceccuti - President of the Fondazione Spadolini
Cosimo Ceccuti – President of the Fondazione Spadolini

The “home of books” at Pian dei Giullari was the residence of Giovanni Spadolini and today is the headquarters of the Foundation which bears his name, promoting his cultural and civic heritage. It looks down on the city of Florence from the hill above San Miniato and Piazzale Michelangelo. Spadolini’s villa, (called the Circle of Cypresses) was built around the middle of the 60’s close to his grandfather’s old home, an ex-convent bought in the beginning of the 1900’s, with almost ten hectares of land with olive groves, orchards, and cypress trees that slope softly toward Via Pietro Tacca. These were the places of his fairy-tale years, as Spadolini himself defined them, populated by people he loved, family memories and the remembrance of the unforgettable summers of his infancy.
The “home of books” was meant to hold forty thousand volumes, (almost half of those collected by the “Professor” during his lifetime, which ended in August 1994, at the age of 69) today is a library-museum, containing books, periodicals, historical relics from the Napoleonic era and from the period of Italian unity, as well as paintings and engravings by nineteenth and twentieth century artists.

Giovanni Spadolini (1925-1994) in his library
Everything has remained exactly as it was, the furniture and paintings, the volumes, divided by subject and author, all is placed just as it was decided by Spadolini, bearing witness to a life dedicated to culture and to “a particular concept of Italy”, as he would often say. And so it will remain, thanks to the efforts of Antonio Paolucci as well as other friends from the Department of Art and History of Florence, a procedure has begun which will safeguard and maintain the entire collection contained in both “the home of books” as well as in the Via Cavour apartment where Spadolini was born and where he lived with his mother until 1978.
Upon entering, your attention is drawn to the massive antique bookshelves, the contents of which are dedicated to Carducci: documents, newspapers, leaflets and national editions of his works. The entire opus of the author of “Giambi and epodi” was put together in the years he was editor of “The Resto del Carlino” newspaper, between 1955 and 1968, updating this collection, like all the others, through the following years. Going past the entrance, to the right, two paintings, by his father Guido, in the post-macchiaioli style, alternated with drawings by Rosai, and works by Montale and Sironi, and all together, in what once was the dining room, we find an extraordinary collection of works by Ardengo Soffici, together with marine and forest scenes which depict Versilia, and, on one of the walls, a collection of XIXth century plates, which depict the epic moments of Napoleon’s career.

Giovanni Spadolini museum house
Giovanni Spadolini museum house

On the opposite side, we find the ground-floor library. The first room is dedicated to publications on XIXth century Florence, with works by Vieussioux and the complete collection of “Antologia” as well as the collection of “Nuova Antologia” which began to be published in 1866 and is still published today by the Fondazione Spadolini. In this room, we find literature on and by the Tuscan “greats” from Vieussioux to Capponi, from Ridolfini to Franceschini and a complete collection of their periodicals such as the “Guida all’Educatore”, the “Giornale Agrario” and the “Archivio Storico Italiano”. Furthermore, all of the great Florentine editors from the Risorgimento period of the unity of Italy, are found here, from Le Monnier to Barbera, with their extraordinary series of books by authors such as Foscolo, Leopardi, Manzoni, Guerrazzi, Piccolini and De Amicis. Decorating the walls, we find important paintings representing the period of the unification of Italy, with portraits of Mazzini and Garibaldi by various artists, like Ademollo. The next room contains general literature, divided into 4 main sections: Florence between the two world wars, with editions by Valecchi of authors such as Prezzolini, Bargellini, Ojetti, Palazzeschi and Soffici, a section on futurism, a section containing the books of Spadolini’s childhood, and finally, one on the authors who contributed to the literary section of the “Corriere della Sera” in the years Spadolini directed it, such as Flaiano, Chiara, Biagi, and Soldati. In the large hall, a series of shelves contain works by those he considered his “Teachers and Colleagues”, people who were important in the cultural context of Giovanni Spadolini’s life and who shared his civic commitment: Salvemini, the Rossellis, Croce, Gentile, Oriani, and, most of all, Gobetti, Einaudi and Montale, Bobbio and Valiani, Galante Garrone and Silone.
The “Rosai” room, (Spadolini liked to dedicate a room to each painter) is a true gem. Found on the ground floor, it was once the living room, with large windows facing the garden. Pictures by Rosai are everywhere, objects, caricatures, (many by Forattini, but also a few political-allegorical by Guttuso), and antique shelving which contains Spadolini’s own writings. Here, we also find many objects collected during his many trips. A wide spiral staircase leads to the top floor where the view of Florence and its landmarks is breathtaking. Along the stairs, we can see some rifles and an ax used by Garibaldi’s army, and an extremely rare handkerchief-flag dating back to 1848 when the yellow and white of Pope Pius IX was represented together with the red, white and green. Engravings by Spadolini, one whole wall dedicated to works by Maccari, and landscapes by Longanesi and Nino Caffe are on display here.
In the small drawing room to the side, more gems can be discovered. This is the “Morandi” room, in which we find a canvas, a drawing and a number of engravings by the great artist, whom Spadolini knew and spent time with during his years in Bologna as editor of the “Resto del Carlino”. In the large bookcase, the gift Spadolini received when he left the paper, we can admire the collection of presents given to him during the period he was Prime Minister (1981-82), the most beloved being the 1826 edition of Rome, Naples and Florence, two volumes contained in a book-shaped box, signed by the French President of the time, Francois Mitterand
A gallery which looks down upon the city contains precious volumes on the history of Florence and Tuscany (incunambles and “cinquecentine” some by Savonarola). On the other side, a collection of volumes on Illuminism, the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era, including all of the illustrations of the Enciclopediededicated by Diderot and D’Alambert to the Grand Duke of Tuscany, Pietro Leopoldo.
Two showcases contain a number of relics from the Napoleonic period, and that of the Italian unity, and deserve to be looked at closely. The most touching, perhaps, are two unique examples of the first Italian flag, in which the narrow stripes, like those of the Bastille, for the first time show the green in place of the original orange.
Two rooms in what once was the bedroom area, have a cozy, family air. Giovanni Spadolini’s bedroom is decorated with paintings and sketches by his father, Guido, and represent that “fairy-tale school is evident, in the subject matter as well as in the distribution of color and the treatment of light and shadow. To conclude our tour with a smile, in the next room, once used as a guest room, important paintings by Caffè are on display, and one whole wall is covered with humorous caricatures of Spadolini.
The “house of books” contains less than half of the Foundation’s volumes and periodicals. The entire modern history section, from the Congress of Vienna (1815) to present day is located in the Library in via Pian dei Giullari 36/a, donated by the Cassa di Risparmio di Firenze. Historic-documentary exhibits, seminars and conferences are held here and the library is open to scholars from Monday to Thursday non-stop till late afternoon.
Furthermore, twenty thousand more volumes, pertaining to art and cultural heritage are found at what was the Spadolini family apartment in Via Cavour, 28, together with the original antique furnishings and paintings.
The entire collection has been catalogued digitally, with indications as to the whereabouts of each single entry, as well as the bibliographical details, and is available for consultation upon request, thus following Giovanni Spadolini’s wishes in donating to the foundations his important collection.

 

Cosimo Ceccuti
President of the Fondazione Spadolini

quarto di pag_alta_def


For guided tours by appointment at the “House of Books” by Giovanni Spadolini:
Fondazione Spadolini
Nuova Antologia
Via Pian dei Giullari 139
50125 Firenze
Tel. 055 687521
Fax. 055 2298425
e-mail: nuovaantologia@cosimoceccuti.191.it



Italian version
:

La “casa dei libri” a Pian dei Giullari. E’stata la residenza di Giovanni Spadolini, oggi sede della Fondazione che ne porta il nome e ne diffonde insegnamento culturale e civile: affacciata su Firenze dalla collina sovrastante San Miniato e il Piazzale Michelangelo, rimasta pressappoco come era nel ‘400 e nel ‘500, dominata dalle dimore di Francesco Guicciardini e Galileo Galilei. Sorta, la villa di Spadolini (si chiama “Il tondo dei cipressi”) alla metà degli anni Sessanta, a fianco della vecchia dimora del nonno, un ex-convento di suore acquistato nei primi Novecento: con quasi dieci ettari di terra tenuta a olivi, cipressi, alberi da frutta, degradanti verso via Pietro Tacca. I luoghi dell’età favolosa, come li definiva Spadolini, popolati di affetti, di memorie familiari, di ricordi delle indimenticabili estati degli anni dell’infanzia. La “casa dei libri”, destinata ad accogliere quarantamila volumi (circa la metà di quanti messi insieme dal Professore fiorentino nell’arco della vita, repentinamente conclusa nell’agosto 1994, all’età di 69 anni, è oggi una “biblioteca-museo”, con libri, periodici, collezioni napoleoniche e risorgimentali, dipinti e incisioni di artisti dell’Ottocento e del Novecento.Tutto è rimasto come allora, dall’arredamento ai quadri, ai volumi rigorosamente divisi per argomento o per autore: tutto come era stato sistemato da Spadolini, testimonianza di una vita spesa per la cultura e per “una certa idea dell’Italia”, come era solito ripetere. E rimarrà così, grazie alla ferma volontà di Antonio Paolucci e degli altri amici della soprintendenza: è in corso la procedura per il “vincolo d’insieme” per la “casa dei libri” e per l’appartamento di famiglia di via Cavour, dove Spadolini è nato ed è vissuto, con la madre, fino al 1978. Appena si entra nella villa l’occhio è attratto da una massiccia libreria antica, riservata a Carducci: opuscoli, documenti, giornali, edizioni nazionali. Tutta l’opera del poeta di Giambi ed epodi, messa insieme negli anni della direzione del “Resto del Carlino”, fra 1955 e 1968 e, successivamente, come tutte le altre sezioni, accuratamente aggiornata. A destra, lasciato l’ingresso, dove ai due dipinti di scuola post-macchiaiola del padre Guido, si alternano disegni di Rosai, opere di Montale e Sironi; in una sola stanza, già sala da pranzo, la straordinaria raccolta delle opere di Ardengo Soffici, corredata di pinete e marine della Versilia e, su una parete, una collezione di piatti napoleonici del XIX secolo, con l’intera epopea del grande Imperatore. Dal lato opposto si snoda la biblioteca del piano terreno. La prima stanza è riservata alla Firenze dell’Ottocento, col mondo di Vieusseux e dell’”Antologia”, di cui esiste la collezione completa accanto a quella della “Nuova Antologia”, nata in Firenze capitale nel 1866 e pubblicata ancora oggi dalla Fondazione Spadolini. Sono qui raccolte le opere di e su i grandi toscani, da Vieusseux a Capponi, da Ridolfi a Lambruschini e le loro riviste, quali la “Guida dell’Educatore”, il “Giornale agrario”, l’”Archivio storico italiano”, naturalmente complete. Ancora, i grandi editori del Risorgimento, da Le Monnier a Barbera, con le loro straordinarie collane e i loro autori: Foscolo, Leopardi, Manzoni, Guerrazzi, Piccolini, De Amicis….Alle pareti importanti dipinti dell’epopea risorgimentale, di Ademollo ed altri artisti, con prevalenza di Mazzini e Garibaldi. A fianco una stanza riservata alla letteratura, con quattro sezioni dominanti: la Firenze fra le due guerre, con gli autori e le edizioni di Attilio Vallecchi (Papini, Prezzolini, Bargellini, Ojetti, Palazzeschi, Soffici…) ; i futuristi; i volumi dell’infanzia di Giovanni Spadolini; i collaboratori alla terza pagina della direzione del “Corriere della Sera” del Professore, come Flaiano e Chiara, Biagi e Soldati …

In un grande salone con le librerie a pettine sono accolti i “maestri e compagni”, cioè le personalità della cultura che hanno contato nella vita di Giovanni Spadolini o ne hanno affiancato l’impegno civile; Salvemini e i Rosselli, Croce e Gentile, Oriani e soprattutto Gobetti; Einaudi e Montale, Bobbio e Valiani, Galante Garrone e Silone … Autentica perla del piano terreno è la “stanza Rosai”. Era una civetteria del padrone di casa, ogni stanza dedicata a un pittore. Si tratta del “salotto buono”, affacciato sul giardino con una grande vetrata. Quadri di Rosai ovunque; cimeli, caricature (Forattini domina, ma non mancano quadretti politico-allegorici di Guttuso), una libreria antica con una selezione delle opere scritte dallo stesso Spadolini. E infinite curiosità, spesso scaturite dai tanti viaggi e incontri del Professore. Una comoda scala a chiocciola ci conduce al piano di sopra, dove la vista di Firenze e dei suoi capolavori è mozzafiato. In quelle stesse scale due fucili garibaldini e un’ascia dei Mille occhieggiano uno straordinario fazzoletto-bandiera del marzo 1848, quando ancora il bianco-giallo di Pio IX poteva affiancare il tricolore. Le incisioni di Guido Spadolini precedono un’intera parete riservata a Mino Maccari, cui seguono il giocoso ed ironico Leo Longanesi ed i fraticelli svolazzanti di Nino Caffè. Nel piccolo salotto a lato, una serie di gioielli: è la “stanza Morandi”, con un olio, un disegno e numerose incisioni del grande artista, che Spadolini conobbe e frequentò nel periodo bolognese della direzione del “Resto del Carlino”. Proprio nella grande libreria che il direttore ebbe in dono lasciando la guida del giornale sono raccolti i regali ricevuti dai Capi di Stato negli anni della Presidenza del Consiglio (1981-‘82): il più amato l’edizione del 1826 di Rome, Naples et Florence in due tomi raccolti in una scatola a forma di libro con dedica del Presidente francese François Mitterand. Una galleria, affacciata sulla città, comprende volumi preziosi sulla storia di Firenze e della Toscana (con incunaboli e cinquecentine, in specie di Savonarola) e – sul lato opposto – sull’illuminismo, la rivoluzione francese e l’epopea napoleonica: con la collezione, completa di tutte le tavole, della Encyclopédie nella prima edizione italiana, dedicata da Diderot e D’Alambert al Granduca Pietro Leopoldo.
Due vetrine accolgono una fitta serie di cimeli napoleonici e risorgimentali, da vedere ed apprezzare uno ad uno. Il “pezzo” più commovente è tuttavia rappresentato da due esemplari unici delle prime bandiere italiane, con le bande strette e lunghe come quelle della Pastiglia: il verde ha appena preso il posto dell’arancione. Due camere – il cosiddetto reparto notte – ci riportano nell’intimità familiare. La camere di Giovanni Spadolini ha le pareti tappezzate di quadri e bozzetti del padre Guido, sui luoghi dell’ “età favolosa”, Castiglioncello e Pian dei Giullari: in tutti è evidente l’impronta macchiaiola, nella scelta dei soggetti, nella distribuzione del colore, nel gioco delle luci e delle ombre. Quasi per chiudere col sorriso, nella contigua camera degli ospiti accanto ai dipinti impegnati di Caffè, un’intera parete è riservata alle caricature di Spadolini. La “casa dei libri” contiene meno della metà dei volumi e periodici della Fondazione. L’intero settore di storia contemporanea di Spadolini, dal Congresso di Vienna del 1815 ai nostri giorni (40.000 titoli) è disponibile nei locali della Biblioteca in via Pian dei Giullari 36/a, messi a disposizione dalla Cassa di Risparmio di Firenze. La Biblioteca, sede di mostre storico-documentarie, di seminari e conferenze, è aperta al pubblico degli studiosi da lunedì a giovedì, con orario continuato. Ventimila volumi, relativi all’arte, alle città e ai beni culturali, sono infine accolti in quello che era l’appartamento di famiglia in via Cavour 28, dove sono rimasti quadri e mobili d’epoca. Tutto il complesso bibliotecario trova la sua unità nel catalogo informatizzato, che indica accanto ai requisiti bibliografici la sede dove, previo accordo, può essere consultabile l’uno o l’altro volume. E la trova soprattutto nel senso che lo ispira, fedele alla volontà di Giovanni Spadolini, che ha affidato, appunto, alla Fondazione il proprio patrimonio.

 

Cosimo Ceccuti
Presidente della Fondazione Spadolini


Per visite guidate su prenotazione alla “casa dei Libri” di Giovanni Spadolini:
Fondazione Spadolini
Nuova Antologia
Via Pian dei Giullari 139
50125 Firenze
Tel. 055 687521
Fax. 055 2298425
e-mail: nuovaantologia@cosimoceccuti.191.it

 

1 COMMENT

  1. […] In particolare, la Casa Museo di Spadolini (denominata il Tondo dei Cipressi), sita in Pian dei Giullari, è sorta “alla metà degli anni Sessanta, a fianco della vecchia dimora del nonno, un ex-convento di suore acquistato nei primi Novecento: con quasi dieci ettari di terra tenuta a olivi, cipressi, alberi da frutta, degradanti verso via Pietro Tacca.” (cit. Florence is you). […]

LEAVE A REPLY